Rain Gear review: Waterproof Socks (Antu, Dex Shell, Seal Skinz, Showers pass)

The wet season is a bane for all cyclists. In the Philippines, the rainy season lasts for about 5 months (June-October) and typhoons can get really strong. Another problem is the prominence floods in the metro.

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Since 2013, ive tried all sorts of rain gear, ponchos, jackets etc. But I couldn’t find a solution to wet feet. Getting your feet wet isn’t just uncomfortable (I just hate the feel of soggy socks) but wading in flood water increases the risk of waterborne diseases.

I’ve learned about waterproof socks early this year and was able to get some and test them over the course of a month. From lights showers to torrential rains, here’s my take on 4 brands-Antu, Dex Shell, Seal Skinz and Showers Pass.

If you choose waterproof socks, there are several considerations:

Waterproofing-how long can the insides of the sock stay dry?

Breathability-Can it wick sweat and stay cool while pedaling?

Price and Availability- Which is best for my budget and are they available locally?

 

For this review, I did two tests:

The soak test:

Simulating similar conditions while cycling, ive placed each sock in a small container filled with water-around 500ml and let it sit there for 1 hour (average time of my bike commute/leisure rides)

 

The field test:

Ive done a range of rides over the month using each in varying conditions (light showers and heavy rain) between 2-5 hours. Using cycling sandals to allow exposure as well as easy draining of water, these socks were exposed to varying weather to simulate conditions on a tour or longer ride.

 

Antu (Php 1350, locally available at M Paps cycling house- https://www.facebook.com/mpapscyclehaus/?timeline_context_item_type=intro_card_work&timeline_context_item_source=1135239754&fref=tag)

The Australian brand, Antu (https://antu.com.au/) is a three layer sock made of nylon and breathable fabric assuring you that water won’t get in but you remain cool inside . Among all the socks tested, this feels like a regular sock despite its layered construction.  Sizing is exact (I have a medium for my size 42 shoes)

It performed well in the soak and field test as no water came in but it did feel damp suggesting that extended exposure may cause a leak.

The verdict: Among the ones tested, this is the best bang for your buck sock if you intend to go bike commuting or urban rides rides and can serve as a back-up while on tour.

 

Dex Shell (Php1250 available at Lagalag Store SM North Edsa-http://www.dexshell.com/)

I got these when I was about to get home from a meeting and realized that rain was about pour down. Getting my bike from the shop, I pedaled for an hour under heavy rain and encountered flooded parts down south. The Dex shell socks also has three layers that claim to repel water and wick sweat. While it did the job for my commute home, it was never the same after washing it. Apparently ,it lost its waterproofing quality and the soak test verifies this. As some reviews claim, this is the problem with the socks. While I was advised to hand wash them, the packaging and website suggest that these socks are machine washable which I did. But I suppose regardless of the method of washing, quality should be better.

 

The verdict: don’t even bother

 

Seal Skinz (Php 1500 available x7107 outdoor gears-https://www.facebook.com/Xplore7107/)

The UK brand Seal Skinz (https://www.sealskinz.com/) is claimed to be as one of the best out there but pricing has been quite high in the US. In fact, I was surprised that a store in the Philippines carried this at a lower price. Aside from the typical 3 layers, this had a silicon type material surrounding of the sock to prevent entry of water. Sizing is a bit odd as you need to size up (I’m using XL for this one)

For the soak test, this remained dry but during two test rides, I was a bit mixed about them.

For the first ride which was five hours, we encountered heavy rain and flooding at the middle of our journey and it ended up trapping water inside my feet. I suspect that the absence of rain pants was the culprit and the extended period of use saturated the socks’ limit in taking in water.

For the second ride which was shorter (about an hour), it held pretty much well despite the heavy rain and flooding. This time I was wearing rain pants preventing entry points for water.

The verdict: This may be a good choice if you’re commuting to work but you might need to search elsewhere if you want something on tour.

Showerpass cross point (34 USD available from online sellers in the US-https://www.showerspass.com/)

Claimed to be used for bikepacking ( see for a review of this one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oatYzLAti5E), this pair is quite snug fit (I use M/L). Testing suggests that this has characteristics for a bombproof sock due to the thick material and intricate weaving making sure that your feet are dry outside and inside. It performed well under the soak test and even several rides under varying weather conditions. While I happened to stand in flood water for a few minutes, the sock didn’t even feel damp or soggy. In addition, unlike the other three socks, this sets quite higher in the calf of your leg allowing greater protection from entry when passing by muddles or flood

 

Verdict: If you could source this, this is would be an ideal choice.

 

 

To conclude, while waterproof socks can help you get through your bike ride, I’ve learned that using a combination of other clothing (rain pants, overshoes) increases your chances of staying dry amidst extended periods of rain.

 

 

Note: this is an independent review and no sponsorship/financial support was given for the conduct of this review

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bike Adventure: Tingloy, Batangas, Philippines

Batangas, which is located south of Luzon, Philippines features one of the best diving spots in the region. Though I have had a couple of day tours and a 2 days bike trip, a couple of friends and I organized a tour on the island of Tingloy in Batangas. I’ve heard of the enticing beach in this place but what intrigued me is the bike route that lies ahead. Given the summer season, this tour was  perfect to do cycling and swimming.

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Masasa Beach, Tingloy Batangas
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meetup at Buendia, Pasay

We were 13 riders in total and met at the Buendia bus station in Pasay and left 2 in the morning to catch the first trip of the day. After 3 hours, we arrived at Batangas Grand Terminal and pedaled roughly 20km on our way towards Anilao port passing by the town of Mabini and others.

heading to the port early morning

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lock and loaded (Courtesy of Rai Reyes)
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steel forks on sea water!

 

After going to the market for food and supplies, dealing with our boat captain, loading our bikes on the boat and We got to Tingloy island around 8 in the morning and started our trip towards Masasa beach, the popular public beach in the Island. While the route was quite straightforward and mostly paved, we were amazed with the site of the beach as well as the rock formation around the area.

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mini lagoon

heading to the rock formation

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climbing back

After a long climb back to head to the town proper, we decided to proceed to another beach in the island and explore the backroads after a light snack. The road to the beach was both an exciting yet challenging one as it was a combination of paved, hardpack and singletrack paths. Though it was estimated that the backroad to the other beach was about 7km, the intense heat, varying degrees of elevation of climbs and terrain made the trip an ordeal. We arrived at the beach early afternoon and setup camp. Good thing there was a nice homestay that allowed us to stay for the night.

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another beach (courtesy of Rai Reyes)
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taking a dip (courtesy of Rai Reyes)
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as the sun sets (Courtesy of Rai Reyes)
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Grilling it (courtesy of Julie Alparan)

For the second day, some friends went to the beach for another round of swimming while others just relaxed in different areas. After meals, we were picked up by the boat at 2pm and got to Anilao port an hour later. Getting to the terminal early evening, we left for Alabang terminal at 630pm and got back to the city around 9pm.

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heading home

 

Rider Notes:

While i’d recommend Tingloy Batangas as a short get away tour for those who have limited days off and budget, there are several considerations:

 

  1. For an island trip that runs around approximately 15km, this has got to be one of the most challenging routes for me due to the heat, climbs and terrain. Aside from steep climbs on paved and trail paths, we had to contend with fist sized rocks throughout the offroad parts (about 40%) and in some of the steep descents. Though CX bikes can manage this, plus/fat bikes are very much capable of handling the terrain in the island. Of course, skills in trail riding helps.

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  1. The cost of the bus from Buendia to Batangas is 160Php but we were ripped off by the DLTB bus as they charged 200 pesos per bike! Good thing the ALPS bus service going back home didn’t charge any for bike storage.
  2. Heading to the Tingloy Island from Anilao port can be tricky as boat trip schedules can be tight . Though you can take the regular trips for as little as 70 Php (which you may arrive late morning in the island as we have seen with other bikers during our trip), it is advised to go with a group and arrange transfers with other boats and negotiate the price. For our trip, we spent 730 per person for roundtrip transfers. Sure it may be pricey, but we chose our own schedules our stuff was secured by the staff throughout the trip as we were the only passengers on the boat.
  3. Since bike tours help you manage expectations, it is best that items such as cooksets, canned food and water filters are brought when you do this as stores charge higher for items in the island and there are very few them. Also, the island cuts power at 12 midnight and resumes at 12 noon.
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camp food! (Courtesy of Julie Alparan)

Check out the strava route here:

https://www.strava.com/activities/1539231565

 

 

 

Cycling Yogyakarta, Indonesia

This was one trip where i regret not bringing a bicycle…I was fortunate to attend a conference in Yogyarkta, Indonesia and on the side, i was able to take a stroll around the city on foot and on two wheels. Luckily, the hotel where i stayed (Royal Ambarrukmo Hotel. http://www.royalambarrukmo.com/) had bikes to use for free for guests (Ms. Awalia, one of the hotel staff helped me out with my route and other concerns during my stay).

Since traffic was heavy in the city, it was manageable to stroll through roads considering that vehicles were slow (had to be careful though with motorcycles and most of the streets are one-way)…from the hotel, i got to Malioboro Street, the popular tourist location where many key sites are found.

 

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one of the few bikeshops in Yogyakarta
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the ever busy Malioboro Street
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riding on two wheels with the conquer top tube bag for gadgets and small stuff

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If you intend to visit Yogyakarta, you can’t miss the temples at Borobudur and Prambanan as well. I wasn’t on a bike but these massive sites will definitely give you a great workout as you walk through these structures.

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Perhaps next time, i’ll bring my rig and tour Indonesia as it is definitely worth it!

Some tips:

  1. Cycling may be a bit of an adjustment since vehicles move with a left hand drive orientation (it’s right hand in the Philippines).
  2. Uber works in Yogyakarta! since Borobudur and Prambanan was about 40km away from my hotel the driver struck a deal with me to drive me on both sites and bring me back to the hotel on a lower price.
  3. If you visit Borobudur and Prambanan, consider getting the combo ticket (about usd 40 to save 10 dollars)
  4. Food is cheap but very spicy so dont forget when you order to say ‘gak pedas’/’tidak pedas’ or not spicy

A visit to Decathlon Philippines

I first visited Decathlon earlier this year when i was in Singapore. A friend told me that this superstore had a range of sports gear for different activities at friendly prices. Since ive been on the look out for small parts for touring, i wasnt disappointed with Decathlon’s inventory (got my bikestand and cage mounts here!). This month, Decathlon opened its first branch in the Philippines and didnt disappoint. Occupying a large area on the second floor of Festival Mall, Alabang, a couple of friends and i visited the branch.

True enough much like their Singapore counterparts, Decathlon Philippines had a wide variety of sports items (even horseback riding!) at friendly prices.

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They carry the Quechua brand for camping and outdoor gear

For the bike tourer/cycling enthusiast, the house brand called BTWIN has decently priced bikes with satisfactory specs (i predict these can even rival the budget friendly Trinx brand that’s popular in the Philippines). What appealed to me is the large inventory of small items for the bike tourer-bags, accessories such as bike stands, pump, and even cages as well as racks. In addition, the camping gear section also has budget friendly items -sleeping bags, tents and hammocks which may be expensive in some stores.

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What i found also appealing is that the staff were really courteous and spent time talking to us about our gear and cycling trips. hopefully, in the years to come, the staff will maintain this to attract more customers.

While i cant say that the cycling/touring gear will be topnotch as opposed to established brands (dont look for ortliebs, revelate designs or a Surly here), Decathlon addresses the needs of those wanting to try bike touring or even bike to work at very minimal cost…so go check it out!

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the hundred peso bike pump!

 

 

Biketouring the Philippines: Leg 2 (Samar-Leyte)

In this entry, I detail our second leg of our biketour around the Philippines. If you’d like to know what happened during the first part, just click on this https://pedalpowerphilippines.com/2017/04/05/biketouring-the-philippines-preliminaries-and-leg-1-manila-to-matnog-sorsogon/?frame-nonce=e178fb8396

Our friends from Irosin, Sorsogon (approximately 600km away from Manila) brought us to the Mateo Cold and Hot Springs resort for a well-deserved R and R (we’re eternally grateful to Cyrk, Natalie and Paolo for the food, warm welcome and guidance) and the next day they brought us to Bulusan Lake and after a proper send off, we took the boat to Allen, Samar…

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our lodging at Irosin, Sorsogon
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Cyrk and Natalie sending us off to Matnog port (Courtesy of Natalie Grace Gestre)

Day 8 Allen to Calbayog

After taking the boat from Matnog we proceeded to Cyrk’s house in Allen, Samar for the night (we took the 8pm trip and the fare is Php170-fare and bike fee-don’t forget a bungee cord to secure your bikes at the cargo bay)

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off to Eastern Visayas
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All bikes secured

The next morning, we proceeded to Calbayog (approximately 50km away from Allen Port). The road was bumpy and it was particularly hot during the day making the climbs a bit difficult yet the view which gives a glimpse of the seaside makes the ordeal less miserable.

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Loving the climb! (courtesy of Rahnel Sison)
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Seaside view after a tiring climb in Samar (Courtesy of Sagada Loopers)
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a long way to go

We decided to stay at the Coral reef beach resort…though it had a view of the beach we didn’t have access to the shore! Facilities were fairly ok but we managed to get through the night with a wonderful open cottage (1500 for a night and can fit as many as you can) (https://www.facebook.com/TCRBeachResort/).

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Entrance of the Resort

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Still sleeping!

photo op before leaving (Courtesy of Sagada Loopers)

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Day 9 Calbayog to Catbalogan, Samar

Traveling approximately 90kms, the trip to Catbalogan, Samar was even more challenging as we encountered several rolling hills and heat seemed to intensify as the day progressed…good thing though there were several stores along the way where we could rest and take advantage of the shade…Upon the recommendation of Cyrk, we proceeded to the fame hotel located in the heart of the city (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Fame-Hotel/130987193726452). The facility had the basics, but it took an effort for us to bring our bikes to the second floor as the stairs were narrow and steep.

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Capitol Building in Catbalogan, Samar

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Fame Hotel Lobby

Day 10 Catbalogan to Calbiga, Samar (approximately 55km)

Our fortunes changed when weather turned out a bit better as we encountered fair skies…though the terrain had still the occasional climbs, it was fairly manageable…for this day we were greeted with  late afternoon rain (and it was freaking cold!)…we hoped to get to Tacloban but it was getting late and after I sustained a flat tire on my rear, we decided to call it a day at Calbiga, Samar…luckily the town is quite big and had many homestays (at least Php 200 per person per day) and people are eager to point you to the right direction.

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Enjoying soup while stranded
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the homestay at Calbiga-seems to be a home refurbished for lodging-air conditioned rooms are spacious and clean!

Day 11-12

Calbiga to Tacloban, Samar

I remember Mark (who does fieldwork in Mindanao and Visayas) reminding the group that as we approach Leyte, weather is far different compared to the Metro-and he was right-I recall waking up early and it was raining and it was unclear whether we’d be able to get to Tacloban on that day. Though we only needed to bike 60-65 kms to Tacloban, I was concerned about not reaching the Iconic San Juanico Bridge before sunset…True enough, we got to Tacloban at around 7 or 8pm and we weren’t able to get good photos of the longest bridge in the country…good thing the group decided to stay a bit longer as we wanted to go around town.

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At the entrance of the bridge with the ever accommodating Police Officers

The next day, aside from running errands we had our chance to see this beautiful bridge (it is said that the San Juanico Bridge is about 2.16kms long) that connects and Samar and Leyte.

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(S)Trolling the Bridge
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Crossing that iconic bridge (courtesy of Sagada Loopers)

 

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We stayed at the Luxury Suites hotel ((https://www.facebook.com/pages/Luxury-Suite-Hotel-Tacloban-Leyte/174721859269170)) and Yellow doors hostel (https://www.facebook.com/helloyellowdh/) in those days in Tacloban. Both had decent facilities, was quite accessible to other sites in downtown Tacloban and prices were fine (Php 1000 for 5 people at Luxury, and 550 per person at Yellow doors hostel)  compared to others around the area (some charged as high as Php 7,000 per room fit for two people!)

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Walking around Tacloban

I had a reunion of sorts with my former student and her family and i recall talking about the devastation brought about by Yolanda (typhoon Haiyan) several years ago…and she directed me to some sites which served as a reminder of that calamity…

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A nice reunion with my former graduate student, Glenda and her Family

Day 13 Tacloban to Mahaplag, Leyte

After a day’s rest we were up and pedaling again into the heart of Leyte and as we passed by different towns, we got to see different sites that commemorated those who were affected by typhoon Haiyan…

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MacArthur Park, Palo Leyte

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Among the many days in the loop, this stands out perhaps as a heavy day for me as we passed by the mass grave at Palo (which is said to be one of the most severely struck during the typhoon) and memorial marker at Tanuan to pay our respects to those who passed away because of this calamity…

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Memorial at Palo Cathedral

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Memorial marker at Tanuan, Leyte

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I recall this was a  long and physically challenging day as we needed to get to Mahaplag (approximately 90km away from Tacloban) and though the majority of the road was flat, things changed when we got to Abuyog, Leyte where unrelentless climbs were encountered…though weather was cool and breezy, very little lighting was present and made the trip more challenging. We ended this day at the Mahaplag inland resort, (https://www.facebook.com/MahaplagInlandResort/?hc_ref=SEARCH&fref=nf) a nice government run facility which charged a decent price (Php 1000 for four people) but was a fine accommodation.

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Mahaplag Inland Resort before leaving for Bato, Leyte

Day 14 Mahaplag Leyte to Port of Bato

Though we only needed to pedal  about 60kms, we took time in taking photos at the 1000km mark as well as the famous Agas-Agas bridge which is the highest in the country, I remember that aside from several kilometers of climbs, rain was light to heavy prompting us to stop several times to take shelter…The roads are wide and very few vehicles would pass by making our trip to the port of Bato manageable…good thing there was a police station at the town of Bato and led us to a lodging house beside the port (800 Php for four persons) and from there we rested for the next day’s boat trip to another part of the Philippines.

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1000km marker, Mahaplag, Leyte
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With the boys of Southern Leyte (Courtesy of Sagada Loopers)
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Agas Agas Bridge
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View from afar
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Courtesy of Sagada Loopers

Some rider notes:

  1. Interestingly, the Samar-Leyte leg gives you a hint that foreigners often biketour  the area as we were often shouted at with expressions such as “Hey Joe”. Upon interviewing, some locals in different areas, this seems to validate the observation as indeed many European and American biketourers have frequented the area (which seems to be the case in other parts of the country as well).
  2. Roads are tolerable but certain sections are ridden with potholes (specifically ,the stretch from Allen to Calbayog due to many trucks travelling along the area as well as in Tacloban due to frequent road constructions). Be prepared as well to ride with EXTRA caution as traffic is a bit chaotic in the areas of Catbalogan and Tacloban.
  3. If you intend to biketour these regions, February is the perfect time as typhoon season is relatively over and summer heat isn’t as excruciating compared to the ones experienced in April and May (I am grateful to Glenda, my graduate student for reminding me to reschedule the loop from November to February as typhoon season is at its peak in the area during the closing months of the year).
  4. The path from Samar to Leyte is a scenic one. That is, you’ve got a combination of seaside views while riding and mountainous areas as you get deep into the heart of Leyte.
  5. This is where we first encountered a change in itinerary as we were supposed to head to Maasin City, Leyte for the Mindanao leg but we had to change our route due to reported skirmishes between rebel and government forces in Mindanao. Good thing, Cyrk and Natalie recommended that since we were heading to the port of Bato, we would also pass by Agas Agas bridge which was a nice landmark in this leg.

Cover photo courtesy of Sagada Loopers (taken at San Joaquin, Samar)

Biketouring the Philippines: Preliminaries and Leg 1 (Manila to Matnog, Sorsogon)

It’s been a long time since I updated my blog and I had good reason-I took a 37 day biketour with a couple of friends around my country, the Philippines. As someone new to touring/long distance cycling, this ride was initially planned 2 years ago when I wanted to bike all the way from Manila to Tacloban, Leyte. But through the encouragement of friends in the community, we made it into a Philippine Loop. The succeeding sections (and entries) will walk you through our experience. But first some preliminaries…

You might think that our tour was an extensive one. I’d say our tour was a rough survey of the country-being an archipelago with several islands, biketouring the Philippines may take more than 37 days. Therefore, if you’re interested in getting information aside from the stuff I’ll share, you may refer to these pages as well https://www.facebook.com/nelography/  by Nelo Varias and http://bikepackingphilippines.blogspot.com/ by Arthur Reblando and Jaime Perez as these were helpful when we planned our own tour.

For those wondering about how our tour was done, I’d say we (riders) had a couple of common points of understanding which you may find helpful

  1. All of us had varying experiences in long distance cycling-nothing really serious such as joining professional races and all, but we were familiar about the physical, mental and financial demands of the activity.
  2. We weren’t really focused on just merely cycling the route but also devoted time to being a tourist in our country, pedaling our way leisurely with the intent of getting a sense of place and experience what each locale had to offer-food, other activities etc.
  3. In terms of budget, we pegged the estimated expenses at Php 1,000 a day (roughly 20 USD) for food and accommodation. The accommodation were mostly inns and lodges, hotels or resorts (there are many cheap ones with varying levels of quality in service and amentifies). Prices vary from 200-500 per person. Interestingly, the expenses for food and lodging become lower as you go deeper into the provinces (except the ones that are popular among tourists). One popular option that cyclists take would be to camp or stay in government facilities such Barangay (town) halls, Police stations or even basketball courts or waiting sheds which significantly lower expenses.
  4. Striking a healthy balance between safety and adventure were common concerns. This was evident when we had to change our itinerary midway and had to drop a significant portion of our trip in Mindanao where several skirmishes between rebel government forces were reported and we were advised by friends to consider rerouting our trip. Moreover, road conditions and dealing with annoying motorists in narrow roads was experience throughout the journey.
  5. Also, boat trips from different parts of the country were also a concern given that certain ports would offer trips in limited areas. Fees range between Php70 (Cebu to Dumaguete) to 2,000++ (Coron to Manila) and bikes also incur charges (between 100-250)
  6. Timing is crucial. We scheduled this tour in late february to make sure that the areas for touring would be generally dry and manageable.

 

Leg 1 of our tour took 7 days-starting from Manila to Matnog, Sorgsogon (estimated distance of 600++ km)

For day 1, we all converged at KM 0 in Manila to formally start the trip and pedaled to Quezon via Luisiana (to avoid heavy traffic) and ended up in Tayabas Quezon (roughly 130km). Luckily, we were accompanied by several riders who did a send off for the group.

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Convergence at KM0

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early morning snack

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At Pagsanjan, Laguna

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accommodations for day 1 (Casitas Hotel at Tayabas, Quezon)
 

 

Day 2,

In this day we passed by the popular Atimonan bypass road or commonly known as the “bituka ng Manok” (chicken’s intestines) which had several stretches of zigzag roads. We ended up at Villa Paraiso (https://www.facebook.com/villaparaisophilippines/) Caluag Quezon (estimated at 100km)

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Segment of the Bituka ng Manok, Atimonan Quezon

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our bikes before the climb

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Along the abandoned port in Gumaca Quezon (Courtesy of Sagada Loopers)
 

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posing by the shores of Lopez Quezon (courtesy of Sagada Loopers)

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with the whole gang at the Quezon National Park, Atimonan (L-R Buboy Perez, Jun Ureta, Rahnel Sison, Ayla Ellis and Mark Lester Braga)
Day 3 was tough as we entered Camarines Sur and rode through the tough Quirino Highway going to Bicol. Though it was generally hot the whole day, we ended up at Del Gallego, Camarinus Sur (estimated at 80km).

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Entering Bicolandia

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A nice afternoon chat over cool refreshments

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Accommodations for day 3 (https://www.facebook.com/JardinDeArs/)
 

Day 4

This one turned out much better as we encountered cloudy weather with a bit of rain and made our ride through the rolling terrain of the Quirino highway less miserable. Though road construction has been a major obstacle due to several bumpy sections, we managed to get to San Fernando, Camarines Sur (estimated at 90km) and stayed at Tomoyuki inn before heading to Naga City (https://www.facebook.com/Tomoyuki-Travellers-Inn-1423675184608387/)

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nice restaurant along the road that serves spring chicken

Day 5

Though we wanted to head to Legazpi, Albay  to see the popular Mayon Volcano, headwind and heat were major obstacles and had to take a significant number of breaks to regain our energy. We managed to visit the Cathedral in Naga City and decided to stay for the night at Camalig, Albay (Estimated at 95km). We stayed at the Kapistahan lodge (http://ww3.kapistahanlodgeandsuites.com/about-us) where we got to see a good view of the volcano early morning of the next day

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Basilica Minore, Naga City

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A bit late and cant see the volcano
 

Day 6

We spent time at the Cagsawa Ruins in Albay where the old church tower and the full view of the volcano was in sight. After a couple of hours we headed to Sorsogon where a couple of friends were eagerly waiting for us to arrive. I recall the trip from Bicol to Sorsogon  (estimated 105km) was a challenge as rolling terrain and certain sections of climbs were encountered coupled with dry spells of heat. Good thing our good Samaritans from Irosin, Sorsogon met us to bring us to a nice hot spring resort in the area.

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Entrance to the Cagsawa Ruins

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With the whole group (Courtesy of Sagada Loopers)

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The old church tower
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Hot Spring Galore in Sorsogon (Courtesy of Sagada Loopers)

 

Day 7

For last day in Luzon for our loop, our good Samaritans Cyrk and Natalie of Irosin Sorsogon brought us to Bulusan lake-a popular site in the area. We were given a walking tour by the park staff and had lunch and coffee with our friends. Late afternoon we proceeded to the port of Matnog to take the Boat going to Eastern Visayas (estimated 25km).

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Stunning view of Bulusan Lake, Sorsogon

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the walking tour

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Visiting the Cold Spring

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Our wonderul good samratians (L-R: Cyrk Lim, Natalie Gestre and Buboy Perez)

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my mentees’ hometown
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Finally leaving Luzon
Cover Photo courtesy of Sagada Loopers

 

Dream, Build, Inspire: Tree in Lodge, Singapore

One of the problems if you intend to do touring in different countries is places to stay. In my recent trip to Singapore, I wanted to stay at a place which I’d learn some things about my hobby but at the same time, learn something about the culture as well.

I got in touch with Sk Lah from the Tree in Lodge mid 2016 since they were also selling items on bike touring (check out greenbasikal.com) and I was able to check their place as well.

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Sk getting the Conquer Saddlebag made in the Philippines (https://www.facebook.com/conquercustombags/)

Early this year, since I had a month long stay in Singapore, I decided to check in their hostel and gained several insights and experiences.

For starters, the hostel is a few minutes walk from Outram station MRT and is near to several hawker centers as well as grocery stores. The hostel has several rooms for sharing. In my case, I stayed with three other people who were staying longterm and had no problems with getting along with everyone in the place.

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with roommates having fun on boardgames

With free breakfast, wifi and information needed to get around the country, the hostel is the perfect place for the authentic Singaporean experience as they give recommendations as to where to go and what to try.

For the bike tourer, SK and other staff are knowledgeable about routes in Southeast Asia as they have hosted many tourers from the US and Europe. Aside from recommendations on itinerary and all, their stories about their own bike touring adventures have been inspiring. For instance, Sk and his friends did cycling trips from Finland to Singapore, Taiwan and other parts of SEA. In fact, their stories have prompted me to plan for future cycling trips in the region as well since the costs can be very minimal but the experience is all well worth it.

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some bikes of tourer checked in at the hostel
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Dinner at Tiong Bahru with guests and staff
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A quick ride with Yew at Faber’s peak
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with Yong, another member of the hostel staff

While many believe that staying in Singapore can be very costly, the experience with the Tree in Lodge (https://www.treeinlodge.com/) will make you think otherwise. Best of all, it is one of those much needed places in other countries that can open interactions with other bike tourers from different parts of the world.

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A parting gift from the Philippines