Marin Four Corners: Initial Impressions

I’ve had the Marin Four Corners for about 3 months now but i havent had a chance to tour with it. Recently, a couple of friends and i had a short multiday trip up north and used this bike for that purpose.

41039133_222569098613268_4087967739396751360_n

For starters, the Marin Four Corners  (check the specs here https://www.marinbikes.com/bikes/2019-pavement-drop-bar-utilitour-four-corners) was designed for bikepacking expeditions.

Made of chromoly steel, lots of mounting points for racks and cages, the frame also features varying wheelsizes depending on the size you’d get. In my case, i got the small size with 650b wheels. In terms of drivetrain, it sports Shimano sora 3×9 components with 50-39-30 upfront and 11-34 for the sproket. For stopping power, it has the TRP spyre mechanical brakes. the rest of the pieces are typical OEM components with the exception of the tires which are wtb resolutes (650bx42)40025462_10212822169855755_7147014241277444096_n

In terms of the ride, the Marin four corners reminded me of the Surly Disc Trucker on 650b wheels-slow yet the low bb height and chainstay length gave you sure footed stability during climbs. While i haven’t loaded this much as i packed light during the tour, i felt that the bike has a livelier feel when loaded with racks and panniers.

40753936_2019545648097218_9198672276935933952_n

 

With regard to gearing, i felt that this was adequate giving a wide range of gear ratios, the 3×9 sora can definitely be a good option for long haul touring. while it is the first time ive used TRP mech brakes, there’s nothing really special about them. it does the stopping with fine modulation. One of the interesting things about the stock build is the compact 12 degree flared drops which to me were comfortable despite the sizing (mine had 40mm width). It reminded me of the soma condor in terms of comfort as you would prefer to stay on the drops while cruising.

40068299_10212826344880128_2858551819276124160_n

While the recent trip ive had gave me an idea of the comfort and adequacy of the Marin four corners for touring, what i look forward doing with this bike is some off road expeditions as well as loaded trips using racks/panniers.

40685059_278851579387647_5768420208452567040_n

 

Overall, similar to the Marin Pine mountain, the Four corners’ specs are value for money for a built bike which may appeal to those interested in starting their own expeditions on two wheels without breaking the bank.

40967374_261106887849808_8079489063289094144_n

 

Advertisements

Bike Adventure: Ambon-Ambon Falls, Laurel, Batangas

With the extended summer season, a group of friends and I wanted to do another short trip. In the past, we’ve done day rides to different waterfalls in Luzon. The problem though is that aside from the distances and elevation traveled, most of the time, trips would entail hikes limiting our appreciation of these landmarks of nature.

32864701_10212155241422961_3249472471178412032_n

This time, we set an overnight bike trip to Ambon-Ambon falls in Laurel Batangas, which is approximately 70km from Las Pinas (about 85km from Manila). Since one of our friends comes from the area.

For the first day, several riders and i met in Molito Alabang to pedal our way to Tagaytay. The fastest route was through Paliparan heading to Silang. Reaching the roundabout of Tagaytay city early afternoon, we went down via the Sampaloc road, an approximately 15km descent to Batangas.

32803949_10212151527130106_4159831712014008320_n
The meetup

Upon reaching Talisay, we pedaled our way to Laurel, Batangas (about 8 km and left our stuff in one of our friend’s house) and proceeded to the falls.

riding to the falls is both a rewarding yet physically challenging experience due to the mixed terrain of gravel, rock and mud and several stream crossings. This went about for approximately 2km. Good thing weather was dry and heading to the falls wasn’t much of a problem.

Hike, Bike, Hike

 

33100581_10216480251060782_7299669306101465088_o
otherwordly groupfie (courtesy of Ferd Mangubat)

32929184_10212161987951620_7242346507905531904_n

To end the first day, we spend the night at our friend, Ferd’s house on top of the mountain.

33204782_10212158883354007_2054038392433278976_n
dinner is served

The next day, we got back home by pedaling our way up to Tagaytay via the Sampalo-Talisay Road which is 15km of mostly climbs. The early part of the day was really hot but rain fell early afternoon making the climb more manageable. Heading home was a breeze as we simply backtracked our way.

Pic with Ferd’s Dad and Nephew at the house on the top of the mountain

Climbing home

Rider Notes:

  1. bike hikes can be demanding as you need to dismount constantly on varying terrain. In this case, it was good that we used slippers or sandals during the trek to Ambon-Ambon falls.
  2. It is advisable to make the trip 2  months after the rainy season as the falls wasn’t too strong during the summer. In fact, some friends said that the there isnt any water in the falls during the peak season of summer.
  3. Bringing a light bike helps when you carry your rig around during the hike. It is advised to set your bike rackless for trips like this.
  4. I’d say Ambon-Ambon falls is a good day trip if you’re looking for a good challenging ride with a taste of varied terrain in your adventure.

 

Strava route for the trip: https://www.strava.com/activities/1584026203

Featured image courtesy of Ferd Mangubat

Infanta Loop

This past week, we had a long week vacation due to the ASEAN summit. There were several groups and individuals who had multi-day trips and a couple of friends and i decided to do the Infanta Loop in Quezon province, southeast of Luzon, Philippines.

 

Almost a hundred Kms of flats before the climb to Real, Quezon

IMG_8841

Starting in Alabang, we proceeded further south by traveling to Laguna until reaching Famy, Laguna early afternoon. The climb from Famy to Real, Quezon was approximately 15km and luckily it was drizzling making the climb more manageable. After descending a good distance (about 10km), we reached Real around 630pm. We checked in at the Pacific Recreation Kamp and were welcomed by a pack of white dogs (who were really nice by the way)

23467443_10155126939645975_9137242460782299093_o
Resting en route to Real, Quezon (courtesy of JT Tanangonan)
IMG_6315
a long way to go

 

At the Camp with our white doggy hosts

IMG_0596

IMG_4927
Rates at the homestay, there is a store that serve home cooked meals as well

the long way home

We left the resort at 730 and it was nice 20km stroll to Infanta, Quezon and started our climb back to Manila (via the Marilaque highway). As far as i recall, it was a long stretch of climbs of gradual and some steep sections (around 20km in total at least). As a consolation though, weather was fair (certain parts of the route had a different climate due to the elevation and land mass-that’s why we encountered rain all day) and very few vehicles would pass…the view was stunning as well.

23592175_10155126964710975_5768302523741653139_o
along the Marilaque Highway (courtesy of JT Tanangonan)

Silent Hill Cycling (Courtesy of JT Tanangonan)

 

IMG_1202
more climbs over weird weather

Road Construction-what do we get to the other side?!

IMG_4536
Still figuring it out LOL (Courtesy of Cholo Reyes)

One challenge though is that the bridge connecting Infanta to the next part of the highway heading home was under construction and good thing is, the locals and workers helped us transport our bikes to the other side.

At Jariel’s peak heading home (courtesy of JT Tanangonan)

The road home was a bit slow and we got home quite late but the trip was well worth it.

Rider Notes:

  1. The Infanta Loop is a nice quick tour if pressed for time and for someone looking for training for longer trips, this one is a worthy challenge.
  2. The area is also connected to other off road cycling routes worthy of explorations
  3. Weather is one issue that needs to be considered as there are areas with a micro-climate. That is, it can be scorching hot in the lowlands and heavy rain when you get up.
  4. Since the area is less frequented by vehicles in the evening it is advised that you bring strong lights as there are very few street lamps on the way.

 

Cover Photo courtesy of JT Tanangonan

Infanta Loop Route

https://www.strava.com/activities/1273800814